Why Fat Is Not the Enemy and How to Educate Yourself on the Proper Consumption of Good Fats


Is there such a thing as a good type of fat? Short answer, yes. Let’s break it down into the two main groups, which are saturated and unsaturated. Both groups house more types of fat and I’ll keep it simple.

The Good & Essential Fats

Unsaturated fats. These include fatty acids, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats. When monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are consumed in moderation, they can replace saturated and trans fats. This can help lower triglyceride levels, cholesterol levels and even reduce risk of heart disease.

Types of essential and non-essential unsaturated fats.

Omega-3 fatty acids: essential

  • Heart, brain and vision health, anti-inflammatory benefits. 
  • Can be found in fatty-types of fish, avocado, walnuts, olive oil, garlic and flaxseed, and more.
  • Helps aid in weight management.
  • Better bone health (bone mineral density)

Omega-6 fatty acids: essential

  • Lower blood cholesterol, beautiful skin, increased energy are some benefits.
  • Can be found in flaxseed, hempseed, grapeseed, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, pistachios and more.
  • Helps fight off type-2 diabetes
  • Aids in regulating metabolism

Non-Essential Fats

Omega-9 fatty acids: non-essential

  • Suggested use oils like olive oil for cooking.
  • Primarily found in seed and vegetable oil. 
  • Olive, almond peanut avocado oil
  • Almonds, walnuts, cashews

 

The Bad Fats to Avoid

Saturated fats and trans fats.

Saturated fats are mostly found in meat, dairy, baked and fried food products. Consuming high volumes of saturated fats can lead to, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or even death.

Foods containing saturated fat

  • Beef with high-fat content
  • Butter
  • Cheese
  • French fries
  • Pastries

Trans fats or trans-fatty acids are considered the worst fats of all. According to the Mayo Clinic research, it has been known to raise good cholesterol levels while diminishing good cholesterol levels.

Hydrogenated oil is manufactured trans fat and it’s found pretty much everywhere in processed food, be sure to read the labels. 

  • Cakes, cookies crackers contain or anything with partially hydrogenated oil. 
  • Potato chips often contain trans-fatty acids. 
  • Microwave popcorn 
  • Deep fried foods, donuts, fried chicken, etc.
  • Even non-dairy coffee creamer can contain partially hydrogenated vegetable oils.
     

IF YOU ARE STRUGGLING TO GET THE EDUCATION AND SUPPORT  REQUIRED TO START LIVING A HEALTHIER LIFESTYLE, I INVITE YOU TO TAKE MY QUIZ AND ASSESS WHETHER THE ULTIMATE 5-DAY HEALTHY LIFESTYLE STARTER PLAN IS RIGHT FOR YOU. YOU CAN EVEN CHAT WITH MY BOT FOR INSTANT SUPPORT.

When you join my #doit2loseitnow team you get:

  1. Coaching on Fitness + Nutrition

  2. Motivation + Mindset Mastery Tips
  3. Private Group Support
  4. Exclusive Livestreams
  5. Fitness Routines
  6. Meal Plan with Detailed Shopping List
  7. Access to Product Discounts

*This article is not intended to substitute for informed medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or condition. Always check with your doctor before changing your diet, altering your sleep habits, taking supplements, or starting a new fitness routine.

Roland Manny